Category Archives: Visualisation

Browse world heritage with CyArk

CyArk is an international non-profit organization which is aiming to create a free, 3D online library of the world’s cultural heritage sites before they are lost to natural disasters, destroyed by human aggression or ravaged by the passage of time.

The DDS, along with Historic Scotland through the CDDV partnership has been contributing to CyArk through The Scottish Ten project – digitising heritage sites here in Scotland and internationally.

This week, with help from Microsoft, CyArk relaunched their website with fantastic interactive views of many of the world heritage sites already digitised. The new site looks fantastic, and being able to browse many of the heritage sites in 3D right in the web-browser is a very nice touch. Also fantastic that all three projects featured on the home page are from The Scottish Ten – Mount Rushmore, Rani Ki Vav and the Sydney Opera House.

Browsing the projects, you’ll also find other Scottish Ten sites – Scottish sites including Stirling Castle, St. Kilda, neolithic Orkney. and a further international site – The Eastern Qing tombs in China.

Eastern Qing Tombs
Eastern Qing Tombs, China. Captured and modelled by CDDV (Historic Scotland and DDS, The Glasgow School of Art)

Go, browse, enjoy!

(And if you like this kind of thing… details on our International Heritage Visualisation course can be found here)

From Uist to the V&A! co-producing digital heritage with communities

The ACCORD project is working with communities all across Scotland to co-produce 3D models of their heritage using digital technologies. We also have our own blog, here!

ACCORD makes its debut at the V&A!

We were thrilled to have our prints featured at the Digital Design Weekend at the Victoria and Albert Museum, in London from 20-21 September (an event organized as part of the London Design Festival). We are very proud of the work our community groups have achieved and delighted that their heritage has been brought to the world stage through participation in the Victoria and Albert museum’s fantastic weekend of digital culture celebrating co-design!

ACCORD 3D prints
Our ACCORD 3D prints sent down to the Digital Design Weekend at the V&A;  made by the climbers at Dumbarton Rock, Friends of the Glasgow Necropolis, Access Archaeology in the Uists, Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology group, and the Aberdeenshire based Rhynie Woman group.

 

Accord 3D prints on display in the V&A
3D prints made by ACCORD on display in the V&A.

Natural beauty in breathtaking Camas nan Geall

Picture of the Camas Nan Geall bay in Ardnamurchan.
The stunning bay of Camas Nan Geall on the Ardnamurchan peninsula, Scotland.

This is the stunning stretch of coastline where we had the privilege to spend a beautiful August weekend working with the dedicated members of the Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology Group. For a closer look at this pristine slice of Scottish coast, take a virtual peek at Kilchoan Village http://kilchoan.blogspot.co.uk

We explored an 18th century burial aisle in the heart of Camas nan Geall. Check out the wonders of RTI (or Reflectance Transformation Imaging in full) and see how an eroded skull and cross bones on a headstone, supposedly belonging to a Campbell, takes shape, made together with the Ardnamurchan Community Archaeology Group.

The Scientific explanation/RTI for rocket scientists… RTI is a computational photographic method that captures a subject’s surface shape and colour and enables the interactive re-lighting of the subject from any direction. RTI also permits the mathematical enhancement of the subject’s surface shape and colour attributes….

The no-nonsense explanation/RTI for humans… basically, get a £4 shiny black snooker ball, a tripod, and a light… using the movement of the light across the surface of the object the light bounces off the ball and the clever software combines the images to produce these amazing illuminated results – Eureka!

More info? Go to  http://culturalheritageimaging.or /What_We_Offer/Downloads/

The Rhynie Woman group bring the Pictish Craw Stane to digital life!

3D model of the Craw Stane
Snapshot of 3D Photogrammetry model of the Pictish Craw Stane made by the Rhynie Woman group in Aberdeenshire.

Manipulate the model yourself by downloading the PDF on our own ACCORD blog .

The Grimsay Wheelhouse, North Uist

In August 2014, ACCORD sallied forth to the Uists in the Outer Hebrides in order to immortalize in 3D this spectacular example of an Iron Age Wheelhouse dwelling. Together with the Access Archaeology community group, we first recorded the site with photos from the ground and the air using photogrammetry and then with a little help from Agisoft software we produced this awe-inspiring visualization!

And we didn’t just stop there … our next step was to bring the Grimsay Wheelhouse to life in the form of a 3D print – an exact 3D photogrammetric model of the Grimsay Wheelhouse replica to have and to hold!

3D print of the Grimsay Wheelhouse.
3D print of a photogrammetric model of the Iron Age wheelhouse at Grimsay, North Uist. Made by the Access Archaeology group.

ACCORD is one of eleven projects across the UK to be awarded funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s £4million “Digital Transformations in Community Research Co-Production” programme. Led by the Digital Design Studio of the Glasgow School of Art, the project it is being delivered in partnership with the University of Manchester Department of Archaeology, Archaeology Scotland and the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland.

Post Graduate Degree Show at The Glasgow School of Art

A great chance to see some of the amazing work from this year’s MDes Sound for the Moving Image, MSc Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy and MSc International Heritage Visualisation students at the GSA post-graduate degree show. Starting tomorrow (Saturday) and running until Friday the 12th of September. Also a good opportunity to explore the GSA’s fantastic new Reid building.

More details on the GSA website, here. Opening times as below:

Exhibition open to the public 6 – 12 September 2014

Monday – Friday 10am – 9pm, last entry 8:30pm
Saturday – Sunday 10am – 5pm, last entry 4:30pm

The GSA’s Graduate Degree Show offers a public showcase for the full range of graduate work undertaken at the institution. The 2014 Graduate Degree Show will feature work by graduating students across a wide variety of disciplines across architecture, design, fine art and digital.

More details and image galleries at:

MDes Sound for the Moving Image

MSc Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy

MSc International Heritage Visualisation

[Image credit: Anna Mikelsone, MSc Medical Visualisation & Human Anatomy, 2014]

Uncovering the past with Hidden Heritage

MSc International Heritage Visualisation student Clara Molina-Sanchez explored the use of different photography based techniques for the digitization of gravestones.

Working with Hidden Heritage and local community volunteers, Clara was interested in particular in methods accessible at low cost to local community groups that would be strong enough to support the digitization of gravestone and yet be powerful and accurate enough to help uncover hidden detail and support long term archive and conservation projects.

Her results were little short of breath-taking – for example, some of the stones are very badly weathered leaving almost none of the original inscriptions visible to the eye. This can be a significant challenge for heritage groups trying to identify the individuals buried below. Stone 28 at BallyHennan is one of the more badly weathered stones:

Stone 28 at BallyHennan graveyard
Stone 28 at BallyHennan graveyard

Using a method known as RTI (one of two methods Clara used in her project), using around 100 photos and a few hours of additional computer processing significant parts of the inscription suddenly appear:

After performing RTI parts of the inscription on stone 28 are readable
RTI image of Stone 28 at BallyHennan

You can read more about the Hidden Heritage project here.

Applications for the MSc in Heritage Visualisation for entry in September 2014 are still open… more details here.

Masters courses starting in September 2014… last chance to apply!

With classes starting on September 22nd, there is still time to apply for masters study at the Digital Design Studio at The Glasgow School of Art.

All of our courses provide the opportunity for students to learn from and work with leading professionals in the respective field – with in house teams that work closely on research and development projects with the BBC, the NHS, international heritage bodies and major engineering firms.

You can read more about the courses (and find application details) by following the links below

MDes Sound for the Moving Image

MSc Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy (taught with The Laboratory of Human Anatomy at The University of Glasgow)

MSc International Heritage Visualisation

MSc Serious Games Development (new for 2014)

Blacader Aisle… from scan to interactive 3D visualisation

Last term, students on the DDS’ MSc International Heritage Visualisation course worked as a team to scan the Blacader Aisle at Glasgow Cathedral (access arranged with thanks to Historic Scotland) and the surrounding area. 3D laser scanning (using a Leica C10) was performed over a few days, along with a lot of photography to try to obtain some high quality images for use for texture in the final visualisation.

Glasgow Cathedral point cloud
3D laser scan point cloud of Glasgow Cathedral

Students then worked in smaller groups to produce visualisations – this video highlights part of one interactive visualisation running in Unity3D. As well as being able to view the Aisle from different viewpoints, users can also interact with the visualisation to learn more about the windows and the carvings above them.

The aisle (and cathedral) building is incredibly irregular. For example, each window is unique – while all have a similar shape, no two have the same dimensions. The skirt of the aisle likewise has many complex forms.  By building this visualisation from data acquired with a 3D laser scanner, we are able to verify the detail to high degree of accuracy – which then has potential to allow models like this to find additional uses in conservation and preservation.

The Lost Tomb of Robert The Bruce

A special exhibition at the Hunterian Museum at the University of Glasgow presents the first complete 3D digital model of the lost tomb of Robert the Bruce.

To create this exhibition, CDDV (a joint venture between the Digital Design Studio and Historic Scotland) contributed scanning and visualisation expertise in a collaboration with the Royal Commission for Ancient and Historic Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS), The Hunterian (University of Glasgow), the National Museums of Scotland, Fife Cultural Trust and the National Records of Scotland.

You can see the model at the Hunterian Museum until the 4th of January 2015, and read more about the exhibition here.

The Definitive Human

The new Definitive Human website went live yesterday. This is a major project to build a medically validated 3D model of the complete human body, with support from a number of partners including NHS Education Scotland, The University of Glasgow, The Scottish Government, and The University of Edinburgh.

The Definitive Human is building a fully 3D, fully interactive, definitive reference for human anatomy for use in education, training and as a tool for medical professionals to support the planning, simulation and rehearsal of medical interventions.

Contact our business development manager, Brian McGeough if you would like to arrange a demonstration:

Brian McGeough, Business Development Manager
b.mcgeough@gsa.ac.uk

DDS on Vimeo (… and YouTube)

Over the years many videos work from the DDS has found their way online – it can be quite a task finding them across a range of sites.

Over the past few years, the DDS has been using a channel on Vimeo to publish videos – http://vimeo.com/ddsgsa. Here you can find a mix of student (and alumni) work from recent years.

Post Haunted - Student short film
MDes Sound for the Moving Image student work on Vimeo

The Glasgow School of Art itself publishes on Vimeo, at: http://vimeo.com/glasgowschoolofart – and there is also a DDS channel within this account – here. Currently this is where you’ll find promotional videos for our programmes and videos highlighting the DDS’ commercial and research visualisation work – such as from The Scottish Ten.

Over the next year we’ll see if we can move the videos from the DDS’ own channel over to The Glasgow School of Art Vimeo account. On top of these accounts, however, there are also videos of student work uploaded by students themselves – such as this channel created by animation students some years ago: http://vimeo.com/channels/gsa

And lastly… there is also a DDS channel on YouTube. The focus of this last channel will be on instructional video for current students, but it will also act as a secondary location for posting content (after all, browsing YouTube is how a lot of folk find things). You can find us on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/user/GSADDS/